Teaching Philosophy

 

I believe students can and have a desire to learn, and it is my job as a teacher to provide students with a safe space where they can learn and be challenged. They should be pushed to think critically, but not hazed. It is important to remember that students are individuals, each with a life outside of my classroom and a life outside of any classroom, and fostering a lifelong love of learning in students is more important than trying to cover as much information as possible in 16 weeks.

 

I believe learning happens best when students are allowed to exchange ideas, make mistakes, and come to conclusions for themselves. This encourages them to think critically rather than look to authority for answers.

 

In an ideal learning environment, I will evaluate students using assignments that encourage critical thinking, creativity, and practical application. In-class participation points should be supplemented by other forms of participation to account for students who may be timid in class.

 

 

 

Courses

 

Masculinities in America

This course will survey masculinity in the United States. It will investigate its origins and development, its expressions (including in sports and pop culture, racial differences, regional differences, masculine women, LGBTQ, etc) and its problematic manifestations (including hegemonic masculinity, violence, sexual assault, health outcomes etc). By the end of the course, you should have an understanding of the ways that masculinity has shaped the lives and choices of men and women, boys and girls; you should be able to identify and question the taken-for-granted aspects of masculinity. It is also important to remember that this is a class on masculinity not on men. Though men may be the primary participants in masculine practices, women also perform and are affected by masculinity.

Download the syllabus here.

Introduction to the Study of Society

This course will introduce students to the sociological study of society. It is designed to help students understand the larger factors shaping social life and equip them with the tools to interrogate and comprehend the world around them. The course will introduce basic sociological concepts such as the relationship between the individual and society, the social construction of reality, and the causes and consequences of social inequality along with the methods sociologists use to examine these relationships. We will examine major topics in sociological research, including, but not limited to, inequality, mobility, race and ethnicity, and gender and sexuality. We will explore these topics through a combination of readings, lectures, in-class documentaries, and discussion sections. Most weeks will consist of one lecture, one in-class documentary, and a discussion section with a quiz.

Download the syllabus here.

 

Robert Reece; Robert L Reece
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